Megan Gearinger: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Megan Gearinger of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Gearinger’s project was titled “Build Friendship, Grow with Love.”

Gearinger explained, “My project was completed at the Gymnastics Training Center of Rochester (GTC) in Penfield. Sadly, teenage suicide has become a reality in several local schools in recent years, including an athlete at GTC. Teens who feel personally connected to others are less likely to commit suicide. The intention of my project was to build a sense of community on the Girls Gymnastics Team at GTC, so that all girls would feel accepted and cared for. This was accomplished through three aspects of my project. A Card Creation Center was started. This is a box filled with homemade stencils, cards, and markers. Teammates were paired into Big Buddies and Little Buddies. These Buddies send each other cards for birthdays, before/after meets, or for weekly encouragement. This system has been highly successful in building friendships and team support. A wooden bench was built for the gym, as a place for teammates and families to gather and socialize. Finally, a perennial memorial flower garden was planted near the parking lot entrance to help create a welcoming atmosphere and to honor those from the GTC family who have passed away. Through this project the GTC Girls Team has become much more connected and these friendships continue to blossom, even outside of the gym.”

Gearinger added, “Girl Scouts has provided educational and recreational experiences I would not have otherwise been exposed to and has offered leadership opportunities that I may not have taken advantage of. Sometimes I had to leave my comfort zone and that helped me learn and grow as an individual.”

Gearinger will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Elizabeth Del Vecchio: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Elizabeth
Del Vecchio of East Aurora, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Del Vecchio’s project was titled “Charming Sensory Interactive.”

Del Vecchio explained, “My project created weighted stuffed animals for people with anxiety issues. The weight of the stuffed animal helps calm the person that is holding it. I had several groups get together to help cut open stuffed animals, remove the original stuffing or move the stuffing into the legs, arms and head area, and then add weighted pellets. The finished weighted stuffed animals weigh between 1.5 to 4 pounds. I had high school students from East Aurora High School help me make these animals. I donated them to East Aurora Schools and local low-income donation centers. Anxiety issues are worldwide in every age group. I was not able to cure anxiety, but what I did do was help calm a few students in a classroom and at home. The weight of the animals relaxes the student when it is placed on their lap. I was able to help students in elementary school, middle school, high school, and even a few college students.”

Del Vecchio added, “Girl Scouts has been an important part of my life for as long as I can remember. Through my involvement with Girl Scouts, I have developed life values that I will always cherish. I respect everyone that has dedicated their time, skills and resources to help all Girl Scouts. I’ve been very fortunate to go on countless camping trips, along with a trip to Washington D.C. for the 100-year anniversary celebration of Girl Scouts. Growing up as a Girl Scout has made me develop into a team player, a leader, and an independent young woman. For all Girl Scouting has done for me, I am extremely grateful.”

Del Vecchio will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Megan Reilly: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Megan Reilly of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Reilly’s project was titled “Springdale Farm Scavenger Hunt.”

Reilly explained, “I installed a scavenger hunt at Springdale Farm in Spencerport. I incorporated sign language into each of my sustainable signs. This farm is run by Heritage Christian Services and is open to the public. I chose this project because my family used to visit the farm and picnic there when I was a little girl. I worked with many people from the farm including the director, farm manager, camp coordinator, and the IT director. I designed all of the signs and met with a printer. The signs were graciously donated by Phoenix Graphics. You can find my project listed on the Springdale Farm website under attractions. This project has impacted my community by including the deaf community and inspiring others to learn some sign language. My hope is to make people comfortable with another form of communication and help to break language barriers. During my time at Springdale Farm, I also volunteered at the petting zoo and at their summer camps where we were able to incorporate my scavenger hunt and teach the children sign language. It was a lot of fun to see my project in action!”

The sign language video is available at youtu.be/DGD_qP0JMjg for public viewing.

Reilly added, “[Through Girl Scouts] I had the opportunity to do so many different things since I was little. When I was younger I really enjoyed the arts and crafts and field trips. As I’ve gotten older I’ve enjoyed the service projects and our trip to Costa Rica! It was an amazing opportunity.”

Reilly will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Hannah Rauh: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Hannah Rauh of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Rauh’s project was titled “Zika Virus Prevention Project.”

Rauh explained, “I put together one big package full of supplies necessary to prevent Zika virus and sent it to the Milton Cato Memorial Hospital in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. These supplies were distributed to pregnant women who were visiting doctors at this specific hospital. It is important for a pregnant woman to be diligent about mosquito bites because if she catches Zika while pregnant, her baby could be born with microcephaly. Each woman received one bug bracelet, one bug net, a bug spray, one citronella candle, a mosquito coil, a package of repellent wipes, a package of “bug bombs,” and an informational brochure about Zika prevention. I chose this project because of my interest in sciences and global interactions. I visited Saint Vincent and the Grenadines a few years ago and saw the poverty and need firsthand. For the second half of my project, I built 4 bat houses which were put up at Camp 7 Hills! These were just as important as the care package because bats are an essential part of our ecosystem, and help to keep the mosquito population under control. Younger Girl Scouts can also learn about the role of bats by observing the bat houses! I was able to collaborate with my Church, Nativity of Our Lord in Orchard Park, to set up a bake sale fundraiser. I raised almost $500 towards my project! This project definitely impacted not only my community, but a community in Saint Vincent who needed help!”

Rauh added, “Scouting has helped me to become a more friendly and welcoming person towards others. Also, it has helped me to become more outspoken and taught me to work hard to make positive change towards things that are important to me.”

Rauh will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Samantha McAllister: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Samantha McAllister of Buffalo, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. McAllister’s project was titled “Cushions for Cats.”

McAllister explained, “I made cat beds out of old sweaters that I then donated to HEART Adoption Center in Hamburg. I chose this project because I wanted to help animals that did not have forever homes. The purpose of my project was to provide the cats with a comfortable place to rest. The project impacted my community by helping to care for the stray cats that had been brought in. I collected donations of sweaters, shirts, stuffing, and pillows from friends, family, and my school. To make the beds I hand sewed the sleeves to the sides of the sweater, stuffed them, and sewed them shut. In total, I made 28 beds for the cats.”

McAllister added, “Girl Scouting has given me the opportunity to explore and learn more about the world around me, and has opened the door to many friendships.”

McAllister will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Mora Sullivan: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Mora Sullivan of Cheektowaga, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Sullivan’s project was titled “Books For All.”

Sullivan explained, “For my Gold Award, I decided to focus on eradicating illiteracy from my school district and the surrounding Buffalo area. I chose this project because reading is one of my favorite hobbies and I wanted to share this love with others around me. To promote literacy in my community I established a book club at my school where I taught participants the importance of reading while also discussing our favorite novels. Additionally, I made a donation of children’s books to the Child & Family Services of Buffalo so that less-fortunate children would also have the opportunity to enjoy reading. My project was successful in teaching others the importance of reading and positively impacted my community as numerous people began to share their newfound appreciation of books.”

Sullivan added, “Girl Scouting has taught me the importance of serving my community while being patient and respectful. Girl Scouts taught me to follow my own path and to work hard for what I want.”

Sullivan will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Shira Silverstein: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Shira Silverstein of Honeoye Falls, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Silverstein’s project was titled “Garden of Dreams.”

Silverstein explained, “I discovered the Rochester International Academy, an inner-city school for refugee students, most of whom had nothing and lived in extreme poverty. Over the past five years I have run a very successful book drive. I have collected thousands of new and gently used books for these students to keep as their own, which is something they had never had. For my Gold Award, I wanted to do even more to make the lives of these students better. At the suggestion of the Academy’s principal, I helped to create a safe space and made a reading Garden of Dreams in the school’s overgrown and undeveloped courtyard. The courtyard is now a beautiful space, complete with benches and tables, for students to find peace and to read.”

Silverstein added, “Girl Scouting helped form my passion for helping others. It has made me appreciate the value of hard work and true friendship. I will always be a Girl Scout at heart!”

Silverstein will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.