One month left in Spring Renewal 2019!

It’s hard to believe the month of April is over and tomorrow brings us May! While we’re excited about the flowers and sunshine, we’re here to talk about Spring Renewal and the amazing incentives still available for you!

First of all, in case you don’t know, Spring Renewal is a time to re-register for the following year of Girl Scouts. Our membership year begins in October, but renewing early secures your spot for the fun yet to come AND includes amazing incentives.

Renewing your membership by May 31 automatically qualifies your girl for SAGE Tuition Rewards. These points translate to money for college, meaning the $25 you pay for her membership turns into 2500 points, which becomes $2,500 to be used at one of 400 colleges and universities across the United States.

The deal is even sweeter if you’re a co-leader. When you renew early, you receive 3500 SAGE Tuition Rewards points, or $3,500, that your girl, son, niece, nephew, god child etc. can use for higher education.

Outside of those GUARANTEED rewards for re-registering during Spring Renewal, you have other chances to win. If you renew by 11:59 p.m. TONIGHT, you’re entered into a drawing for one of three $200 Amazon gift cards. If your entire troop and two co-leaders are renewed, your troop can win one of two sets of tickets to your favorite local museum or zoo (up to 12 tickets).

Don’t wait any longer! Renew your Girl Scout membership today and win!

Annabella Bogart: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Annabella Bogart of Amherst, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Bogart’s project was titled “Character Counts: Art Initiative!”

Bogart explained, “I worked at Roy B. Kelley Elementary School in Lockport to help instill positive messages and character in the students there. I chose my project because I enjoy working with children and I wanted to use my creativity and talents to help improve their lives. My project is designed to help children learn about morals and character in a fun way that they would hopefully retain as they continue their education. In this project, I painted two murals in the boys’ and girls’ bathrooms that featured a myriad of positive quotes and encouraging messages. I also collected hundreds of quotes for my ‘Quotes of the Day’ compilation, and I created 40 individual videos featuring positive quotes and fun facts to be included in the daily announcements at the school. My project impacted my community as the murals I painted, videos I created, and quotes I compiled will continue to inspire generations of students at the school to be kinder to each other and the world.”

Bogart added, “My time in Girl Scouts has helped me develop into a stronger individual and a more independent woman. The skills I’ve learned throughout the years have not only helped me handle the present, but also have assisted me in preparing for my future.”

Bogart will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Samantha Jaeger: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Samantha Jaeger of Lockport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Jaeger’s project was titled “Humane Education.”

Jaeger explained, “I helped teach humane education with the help of Officer Bob, the Humane Educator at the Niagara SPCA, to school-aged children all throughout Niagara County. This project was important to me because I wanted to stress the fact that adopting a pet should be a choice people make for the life of the pet. I felt if I helped to teach humane education, I could make sure the kids understood it’s not ideal to return their pet to the SPCA, or other rescues because they no longer want their pet. I also made emergency telephone number cards for the Niagara SPCA to hand out to newly adopted pets’ owners. Phone numbers were for the SPCA, emergency veterinarians, Poison Control, etc. I made blankets that I donated to the SPCA, and I made instruction books on how to make the blankets that I handed out to all the Girl Scout Troops that invited me to do a presentation. I sent letters to every school in Niagara County inviting them to have Officer Bob give their students a presentation, and I attended whenever I could. I’m hoping the kids that attended the presentations want to adopt when they are adults, remember everything I taught them on how to care for their pet, and to keep them for the pet’s life.”

Jaeger added, “Girl Scouting has made me a more responsible and respectful person. Being a Girl Scout has taught me to always help out when I can with my family, friends and my community.”

Jaeger will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Lyndsey Giuffrida: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Lyndsey Giuffrida of Honeoye Falls, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Giuffrida’s project was titled “Agility Elements for Dog Training at Lollypop Farm.”

Giuffrida explained, “I designed and built dog agility elements for Lollypop Farm Humane Society in Fairport. There were 5 elements in total: 3 dog jumps, a dog walk, and an A-Frame ramp. I wanted to do this because I love dogs, and I know that shelter dogs need structured exercise and training time in order to stay healthy and be adopted. I built these items to withstand our harsh winters as they will remain outside in the pasture year round. Not only will shelter dogs use the elements, any person in the community can bring their dogs and use the elements to train and exercise their own dogs. In order to complete this project, I secured donations from local businesses for the materials. Morse Lumber donated all the wood, a small-business woodworker donated the stain. I researched a non-skid paint to use for the surface of the ramps in order to help keep the dogs from slipping on the ramps. Paint that is used for commercial deck ramps was donated. I painted the ramps and was able to provide the extra to the farm for future use. I worked with my father as he is an experienced woodworker to learn how to handle the tools and assemble the elements. I learned how to safely use a chop saw, screw gun, circular saw, and electric sander.”

Giuffrida added, “Girl Scouting enforced the values that my parents taught me: to be kind and generous to others. It also provided a way to learn that helping others is rewarding. The experiences our troop had through trips and community service were fun, educational, and I will always remember my years of Girl Scouting.”

Giuffrida will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Lauren Cody: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Lauren Cody of Mendon, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Cody’s project was titled “HFL Volunteer Reader Club.”

Cody explained, “I founded a club at my high school (Honeoye Falls-Lima) in which high school students visit a school in downtown Rochester once a month to practice reading with 3rd-grade students. I chose this project because I am passionate about reading and strongly believe in the importance of fostering a love of words at a young age. This club impacted my community both by giving the 3rd-grade students an opportunity to practice and hopefully fall in love with reading, and by showing the high school students how they can make a difference in their community. In order to raise money for this project, I organized a chicken BBQ at my high school and raised over $2000, which is more than twice the busing expenses for one year. I also solicited the community for book donations so that the students we met with could bring home a book with them after each of our visits. On the trips themselves, I partnered each high school student with one or two 3rd-graders and we read with them for 45 minutes, then played a group game.”

Cody added, “Being a Girl Scout has taught me to take charge of situations confidently and be comfortable with my skills as a leader. It has also trained me to look for ways to improve my community and the world.”
Cody will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Thank you for supporting Girl Scout Camp Week 2019!

Last week we held our annual Girl Scout Camp Week and we had a blast! Thank you to everyone who answered trivia, registered for camp, or showed of how much you love camp by sharing this image or posting pictures in your camp gear!

We held two week-long contests for answering trivia and registering for camp. At the end, we gave away five gift cards, one camp onesie, and A FREE WEEK OF CAMP! Check the image below for all the winners.

It wasn’t just our Girl Scout friends who joined in the fun – Council Staff also had a blast! Here’s a glimpse at some of us in our camp gear:

Just because Girl Scout Camp Week is over for this year doesn’t mean we have to stop celebrating camp! Check out this playlist of videos on our Facebook Page to stay in the loop for all things camp!

Theresa Bienko: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Theresa Bienko of Clarence, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Bienko’s project was titled “History in the Present” and focused on local and personal history in the town of Clarence.

Bienko explained, “I chose my project because I love history and I love Clarence. I was in a Historical Society Club meeting at the high school when a representative from the Clarence Historical Society came in to talk to us about the museum and they had mentioned Charlie Butler and I instantly thought that I wanted to do something with his story. I interviewed a lifelong Clarence native, Charlie Butler, who was in the military for a short time during WWII, and created an exhibit with a video about his experiences growing up in Clarence.”

Bienko continued, “My exhibit also includes an interactive experience with Clarence residents where I provided scrapbooks and they can document their family’s history within them. My roots go very far back with my great-grandparents immigrating from Germany and settling down to build a farm in Clarence. Today my house sits on the very same ground that my great-grandparents farmed on. I hope that more people learned about Clarence’s history as well as take interest with their family’s history.”

Bienko added, “Being a Girl Scout has changed my life. I am so happy that I grew up in an environment with my leader and troop members who taught me that I can achieve anything that I put my mind to. I never thought that I couldn’t do something just because I was a girl, I actually thought the opposite. I always look for a challenge and try to be the best version of myself. I have also become more confident with myself, learned how to be a leader, and be a part of a team. I am going to use the skills that Girl Scouting has given me and use them throughout the rest of my life.”
Bienko will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.