Making an impact in girls' lives starts with you

For more than 100 years, Girl Scouts has been impacting girls’ lives. To girls like Shelby, it doesn’t matter if they’re part trendsetter, part change-maker, part athlete, part engineer, part artist, or part go-getter, because they know who they are and where they want to go next.

Shelby is a Girl Scout in Troop 20258 in Dunkirk, and she’s been in Girl Scouts for 4 years. We want to share her story with you, in her words, about what Girl Scouts means to her.

What are the things you have done in Girl Scouts that you never thought you would do?

I went backpack camping with my troop and we filtered river water to drink. We learned to make a fire using flint. I also competed in the Dream It Do It 500 with a team of Girl Scouts where we made a rubber band-powered car and learned about engineering. I made a lot of new friends by going to programming like that.

How did you feel after you accomplished these things?

I am brave. Accomplishing new things in Girl Scouts makes me happy.

What do you see in your future because of your Girl Scout experiences?

I see myself traveling to France and Japan with Girl Scouts. I have never traveled to another country but Girl Scouts is giving me these goals, and my mom is encouraging even though we have to step outside of our comfort zone.

Because of Girl Scouts, last year Shelby was able to choose from over 150 programs made possible through the support of committed and generous donors.

We asked Shelby’s mother, Kathy, about the changes she’s seen in her daughter through Girl Scouts.

How have you seen Girl Scouts impact Shelby’s life?

She knows how to work as a team, plan out a project, and work together. I’ve seen her knowledge grow in public speaking, leadership, empathy, and acceptance. She is a unique person, some call her weird, but she’s a sweet girl. She likes that she can be anything she wants in Girl Scouts.

How have you seen Shelby grow since joining Girl Scouts?

It’s a constant battle outside of Girl Scouts because she’s not a “girly girl,” but that doesn’t make her stand out when she’s at Girl Scouts. At Girl Scouts Shelby can be herself and be accepted. It’s a safe environment for her. She is now a leader and her confidence shines through her.

In Girl Scouts, girls find a safe place that lets them be themselves in a supportive, nurturing environment while they step outside of their comfort zone and discover new interests.

Shelby knows who she is and where she’s going because of the programs available in Girl Scouts.

We need your help to keep these opportunities available for all girls, because we know that no two are alike and each has her own interests, talents, hobbies, and dreams.

Join us in inspiring the next generation of future female leaders by supporting Girl Scouts today.

Thank you from each girl that gets to experience Girl Scouts because of you.

Please Give Today

Cookies with the Mayor 2018

Girl Scout Cookie Season in Western New York isn’t complete without our visits to see mayors throughout our council counties. This year, we had the privilege of visiting seven area mayors, having our troops ask them questions, and enjoying our delicious cookies with them!

In fact, the mayors are just as enthusiastic as we are each season.

“Each year, I look forward to the Girl Scouts of Western New York visiting Buffalo City Hall with their Girl Scout Cookies,” said Mayor Byron Brown of Buffalo. “I’m a strong supporter of this program because it is dedicated to supporting our shared goal of helping young people build confidence, foster community support, while teaching our youth the importance of entrepreneurship and the skills needed to be successful.”

Through our 5-Question Challenge, the girls can ask the mayors about a variety of things. In Lockport, the girls asked about what specific advice she’d give them about finding their future career paths.

“Read as much as you can. It doesn’t matter what aspect of work you get into,” said Mayor Anne McCaffrey of Lockport. “It’s important to understand the world around you. And establish a good work ethic. The more you put into a certain task, you’ll get the payback from that.”

Eleventh-grade Ambassador Girl Scout Erin Fisher found meeting the mayor so inspiring she’s now considering a future career in politics.

From March 7 to 15, 2018, we visited the cities of Lockport, Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Dunkirk, Batavia, Rochester, and Jamestown.

We planned to take Troop 60095 to meet with Congresswoman Louise Slaughter in Rochester, but she was called back to Washington. We’re so incredibly sad to hear of her passing, and wish to express condolences to her family. She was a force of nature and she will be greatly missed.

Our council CEO Judy Cranston expressed her gratitude to Mayor Brown for his support, and her words ring true for all who welcomed us over the past few weeks.

“The Girl Scout Cookie Program is the largest girl-run business in the world. We thank Mayor Brown for his support, as we work to build the next generation of leaders who embody courage, confidence, and charter, who make the world a better place.”

Click the pictures below to see more images from each event!

1
Lockport Mayor Anne McCaffrey (left) meets with Troops 70923 and 70245, as well as Judy Cranston (right) March 15

2
Niagara Falls Mayor Paul Dyster (left) meets with Troops 70074, 70023, 70127, 70016, 70400, and GSWNY Chief Operation Office Alison Wilcox (center back) March 15

3
Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown (center) meets with Troop 30022 and Judy Cranston March 12

4
Dunkirk Mayor Willie Rosas (center) meets with Troops 20010 and 20033 March 7

5
Batavia Interim City Manager Matt Worth (center) meets with Troop 42003 and Judy Cranston (left) March 8

6
Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren (second from right) meets with Troop 60420 and Judy Cranston (far right) March 7

7
Jamestown Mayor Samuel Teresi (center) meets with Troop 20044 and Judy Cranston (right) March 8