Krystina Gierlach: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Krystina Gierlach of Fairport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Gierlach’s project was titled “Mythbusters Campaign.”

Gierlach explained, “For my Gold Award project, I created a prize wheel displaying common misconceptions about organ donation. This wheel will be given to the Finger Lakes Donor Recovery Network so they can take it to many events in order to spread the truth about organ donation. I chose this project because I think everyone should know the facts behind donation so they can make an informed decision about whether or not to become an organ donor. Too often, people only know what they’ve been told, which is usually something that’s not completely true. I’ve grown up around organ donation and I think everyone should have access to the truth behind donation, instead of only hearing the scary parts. My hope with this project is that young kids will want to spin the wheel and in the process learn about donation at a young age so they will grow up with that information, not any misconceptions.”

Gierlach added, “Girl Scouts has given me a set of values and tons of community service experience. It has also given me friends that I will have for the rest of my life.”

Gierlach will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Kaitlyn Hoitt: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Kaitlyn Hoitt of Fairport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Hoitt’s project was titled “Enhancing the Veteran Experience.”

Hoitt explained, “My Gold Award project impacted the Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital in Canandaigua. I built and created 6 sets (12 boards) of indoor/outdoor cornhole yard games for the VA, and by doing so provided fun and therapeutic games for all disabled and non-disabled veterans, as well as creating an activity that will allow shy or unsure visitors to more easily converse with the veterans. I decided I wanted to help the VA hospital when my Girl Scout troop went there to donate Girl Scout cookies. Their real need was a better way for veterans and visitors to interact, and that lead me to my project. I built the cornhole boards from scratch. I cut the wood, constructed the games, sanded them, primed them, painted, and stenciled them. Additionally, 48 bean bags were constructed of highly durable fabric to hold up for many years of use. This was a really challenging project that would have been so much harder if I hadn’t received the advice and support that I did.”

Hoitt added, “Girl Scouting has taught me survival skills, not just in the wilderness, but also in the business world. I can build survival shelters, fires, and perform first aid. I can speak confidently in front of an audience, set and meet financing goals, and plan and execute events of all types. Girl Scouts has given me opportunities to explore and dive into different cultures and regions in many parts of New York, Vermont, Georgia, and Toronto. Through Girl Scout I have seen the wonders of serving the community, whether that service be simply helping out in a soup kitchen or the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award. Everything makes a difference and an impact on people.”

Hoitt will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Elizabeth Fredette: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Elizabeth Fredette of Fairport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Fredette’s project was titled “Update of Potter Park.”

Fredette explained, “Potter Park is a relatively popular meeting place for many groups in our town of Fairport, but due to the building’s historical status we can’t hang anything on the walls. To fix this issue I made an easel which groups can write on as well as hang posters from. I also updated the first aid kit that was already at Potter, making sure to create a paper so that the Fairport Service Unit could keep the kit updated for the next 5 years. Finally I took this whole process and created a video which I posted on YouTube so that other girls could update their own community centers.”

Fredette added, “Girl Scouts has given me so many opportunities to give back to my community over the years. It has also helped me to meet many other girls and even given me the chance to see the impact of my influence on them. Girl Scouts has given me almost all of my strong female role models, including my troop leader who was also my mother, all of my fellow scouts’ mothers and all the women who helped run the Fairport Service Unit. I don’t think I would be as confident in myself as I am had I not been given the chance to be a Girl Scout. I’ve built a friendship with the scouts of my troop which I’m sure will extend well into our adult lives.”

Fredette will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Work at Camp Piperwood this summer!


Do you want to volunteer this summer?  Are you looking to do an internship for college credit or majoring in education or camping administration?  Do you love working with children in an outdoor setting?

You can be part of a fantastic summer experience and make a difference in a child’s life!  All you need to do is become a summer camp counselor. You will help girls ages 5-17 develop their full potential; learn to work with, relate to, and respect others; and make decisions while contributing to the camp community. 

In addition, girls and staff alike will make and rekindle friendships, laugh, smile, and experience many new and different things. Paid and volunteer positions available.

Positions available at Camp Piperwood (Day Camp):

  • Unit Counselors
  • Ropes Course Director (training provided)
  • Ropes Course Counselors (training provided)

Interested applicants please contact Janet DePetrillo, Director of Camp Administration at (716)935-6063 or janet.depetrillo@gswny.org To fill out an application click here.

Camp is a commitment of 6/7 weeks, 1 week of staff training and 5/6 weeks of camp.  Although we would like all staff to be able to commit to the entire summer, we realize that sometimes situations arise that prevent this.  If this is the case for you, please do not let this deter you from applying.  We will work with you on the number of weeks that you can commit to working at camp. 

  • Day Camp Dates: Staff week- Saturday, June 22 to June 27, and July 1 through August 10, 2019 summer camp sessions.