Election 2018: Girl Scouts Then, Leaders Now

The 2018 midterm elections gave women a reason to celebrate: out of the 266 women who ran for office, nearly half of them won their seats for a record-setting number of women in the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives. 

Even better? Of those elected to the 116th Congress, 60% were involved with our program. An impressive 74% of our women senators and 57% of women representatives and delegates are Girl Scout Alums.

The number of women governors in the United States increased by 6% and 56% of them were Girl Scouts. 

More than just numbers, 2018 boasted many historic firsts for women:

  • Kyrsten Sinema became Arizona’s first female senator, defeating Martha McSally. Both are Girl Scout alums.
  • Ayanna Pressley, Girl Scout Alum, is Massachusetts’s first black congresswoman.
  • Texas has its first Latina congresswomen with Sylvia Garcia and Veronica Escobar, Girl Scout Alum. 
  • Marsha Blackburn is Tennessee’s first woman senator. 
  • The first Muslim women EVER were elected to Congress – Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar. 
  • We also have the first Native American women in Congress – Deb Haaland and Sharice Davids. 
  • Kristi Noem was elected as South Dakota’s governor, becoming the first woman to hold the position.
  • Both Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Girl Scout Alum, and Abby Finkenauer were elected to Congress and stand as the youngest women ever to serve. 
  • Jahana Hayes is Connecticut’s first black congresswoman. 
  • Stacey Abrams, Girl Scout Alum, was narrowly defeated in the Georgia gubernatorial race, but stands as the first black woman to be a major-party gubernatorial nominee in the United States. 

We’re so proud of what our sisters accomplished this year and how they’re continuing to break the boys club mold. But our work isn’t done. 

Even with this year’s exciting statistics and stories, the gender gap is still an issue in our elected offices. Between governors, senators, and representatives, there are 591 offices. Only 136 are currently held by women, meaning they hold less than 25% of the positions available. 

The reason women don’t hold more positions is because they aren’t running as frequently as men. More than 65% of girls say they’re interested in politics, yet something stops them from running for office as adults. Some of those reasons include:

We know our Girl Scouts gain the confidence they need to succeed in their lives. The 2018 midterm election results are proof that Girl Scout show’s girls they’re capable of more by encouraging them to be leaders and sure of themselves. 

Here’s to working toward an equal future, where women being good enough or smart enough to run for office isn’t even a consideration because they know what they’re capable of. The future is female. 

Why We Remain Girl-Only: The Girl Scout Difference

With the Boy Scouts making the monumental decision to admit girls into their programs, many have asked if Girl Scouts will in turn welcome boys. Some feel that in 2018, a true step of gender equality is to accept all to whatever program they desire. While we believe that it’s time to separate the idea of what constitutes ‘boy things’ and ‘girl things,’ Girl Scouts will not compromise our belief that our program works because it is girl-only.

Unfortunately, we live in a world filled with both conscious and subconscious gender bias. Research shows that girls are more self-conscious in environments with boys and are even less likely to raise their hand in class. Teachers frequently leave boys to solve problems on their own while providing girls with a little more assistance.

Examples like these show how girls are taught from a young age that they aren’t capable.

It’s not as if everyone is setting out to place these prejudices against females, but the sad reality of our culture is that’s what happens. Think about your own experiences. Whether it’s getting cat-called on the street, being mansplained to about an area you’re educated in, getting passed over for a promotion because it went to a man with less experience, or having men comment on your appearance at work, it’s likely you’ve felt these frustrations.

The whole world still feels like a boys club, with professions still regarded as for men and activities that discourage girl participation. Most of our lives are spent around the opposite sex, so Girl Scouts serves as an oasis where girls can grow without feeling the societal gender pressures.

Some will argue further that the separation shows girls they can’t compete with boys, and an organization with both genders levels the playing field, but they’re missing the point. When combined, girls are less likely to be confident, take risks, or experience new opportunities. Girl Scouts allows them to grow and try new things where it’s safe and judgement-free.

If you need to be further convinced, check out this post from Girl Scouts of the USA > 10 Reasons Girl Scouts is (Still) the Best Place for Girls

At the end of the day, we have the research that shows girls thrive in all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environments. Not only do they learn better, they have the chance to try new skills, see what they’re capable of, be leaders, and know that failure is okay because we always get back up and try again.