Hannah Lehsten: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Hannah Lehsten of West Seneca, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Lehsten’s project was titled “HighPointe Mural.”

Lehsten explained, “For my Gold Award project, I painted a hallway at a facility called HighPointe on Michigan. The area of the facility that I painted was the entrance, from the outside, to the pediatric center. I painted the walls the theme of a popular cartoon character. My project served the community of HighPointe, with the patients and the employees. This project will bring joy to all the staff and children that go in and out of that hallway every day. The issue that my project addressed was the issue of disabilities involving children. I created a happy and welcoming place in which the children feel comfortable in. The root cause of the problem is a social stigma surrounding children with disabilities being helpless. I addressed this by making the kids feel safe and happy.”

Lehsten will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Emilia Peracciny: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Emilia Peracciny of Middleport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Peracciny’s project was titled “Middleport’s Little Free Library.”

Peracciny explained, “I built a Little Free Library on Main St. in Middleport in memory of a family friend, Connor Callaghan, to promote sharing and reading in our community. The library will remain open for residents to give a book and take a book. I built and painted the library, installed it, and had a book drive to get started.”

Peracciny hopes the library will encourage people to put aside their electronic devices and read a real book. Connor Callaghan passed away in 2017 and was an avid reader. He was compassionate, cared for others, and shared what he had to offer with others.

Peracciny will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Paige Phillips: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Paige Phillips of Victor, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Phillips’ project was titled “Cupcakes for Life.”

Phillips explained, “I held two decorating classes, one for ages 6-8 and the other for ages 9-10 at a local daycare. The classes, held at TLC daycare in Victor where I went as a child, held around 20 children combined. My purpose was to teach a simple and very useful piping technique that is universal in the baking world. This was to excite kids and provide the means to explore decorating, and therefore, baking. The community it served was the young kids that attended the class, but once they left the class the goal is that they bring the lesson home and continue with the baking and decorating with their family and sharing it with their friends and the town itself. The blog I posted on the internet was an expansive effort to reach as many people as possible. Overall, the class provided the children with a pressure-free and fun environment in which they could try new activities and techniques. Decorating can be a creative outlet, and I wanted to show the kids that it is possible for them to make beautiful outputs and they can enjoy doing it. I created a lesson containing a series of pictures displaying step-by-step piping and decoration of a cupcake. It also had each step of the class and the approximate length of each activity.”

Phillips added, “The tools that I learned in Girl Scouts regarding leadership, discipline, dedication and being service-minded helps me as a Stamps Scholar at Elizabethtown College.”

Phillips will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Bethany Sielski: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Bethany Sielski of Lockport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Sielski’s project was titled “Community Book Drive.”

Sielski explained, “For my Gold Award, I hosted a book drive at Roy B. Kelley Elementary School in Lockport. I worked with the students and staff at the school and encouraged them to bring in any unwanted books they owned for me to collect and donate. Also during this time, I visited each classroom and completed activities I created with the students that taught them lessons about the flexibility of language and the power of creativity. Overall, I collected 1,517 books over the course of three weeks. I then worked with the Liberty Club at Lockport High School, Pinnacle Community Services, and the VVA Buffalo program to distribute these books to places in need. My entire project followed a theme very important to me: language. In the Fall I will be attending college as an English major, and I wanted to inspire a love of the English language in younger kids, as well as provide access to books to those who may be less fortunate.”

Sielski added, “Girl Scouts has taught me so many practical skills, but it has also given me a platform to improve my community. I’ve made so many friends through Girl Scouting, as well as a lot of connections that will help me in the future.”

Sielski will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Cassandra Stanton: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Cassandra Stanton of Webster, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Stanton’s project was titled “Growing Closet.”

Stanton explained, “My project was a growing closet for parents to take an outfit and leave an outfit for their child. The closet consists of outfits from newborn to 2T sizes. This closet is located at Eastside Pediatrics in Fairport. I original bought 20 outfits for each gender with 4 in each age range. In order to grow the closet, there’s a donation box for parents to leave clothes their child has grown out of. My project helped to recycle clothes to parents who could really use them. This project helps all types of parents, no matter their financial situation. Since poverty is a national issue, this is a small step toward help those in need.”

Stanton will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Emily Tills: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Emily Tills of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Tills’ project was titled “Raising Awareness of Bluebirds.”

Tills explained, “I made it my mission to help increase the bluebird population in Orchard Park. I went around various parks and took note of what needed to be repaired and sent it to the town engineer so he could start making said repairs. I also educated younger Girl Scouts and let them know how they could help out too. Then I made a website to document my findings and to increase awareness of bluebirds. I chose my project because I noticed that the bluebird population was declining and I wanted to do something about it.”

Tills will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Emily Townsend: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Emily Townsend of Lockport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Townsend’s project was titled “Watershed Awareness.”

Townsend explained, “My Gold Award Project’s purpose was to raise awareness in Lockport of where the city’s watershed flowed and how it affected the environment. Collaborating with my environmental sciences teacher, I was able to make the watershed known so that my community is more conscious of throwing their waste into waterways. I gained permission from my school principal to paint on school grounds. I gathered materials (cement paints, brushes, water buckets). Then I drew out my design with chalk and began painting. I hoped to catch the community’s attention with colorful storm drain art and the bodies of water the storm drain led to and how they were benefited.”

Townsend added, “Being a Girl Scout has taught me many lessons about respect, friendship and hard work. I now plan on becoming a leader to provide the same opportunities my leaders have for me.”

Townsend will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.