Anna Jegierski: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Anna Jegierski of Alden, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Jegierski’s project was titled “Promoted and Established Danny’s Helping Hands.”

Jegierski explained, “A counselor in the Iroquois School District needed help promoting the program Danny’s Helping Hands because she wanted to see its benefits spread to other communities. Danny’s Helping Hands was started in memory of Danny, a young man who was bullied, yet always gave the shirt off his back to help others. The organization provides items to families in need. I worked with Alden Middle School administration and counselors to bring this organization to my school district. Some of my peers don’t have access to hot showers or hygiene products and are bullied for it. Danny’s Helping Hands at Alden Middle School gives students the opportunity to get cleaned up in a private environment and also take hygiene items home. I have been asked to restock the supplies and also provide healthy snacks for kids who are hungry and cannot afford them. I started my project by hosting a talent show which featured 25 performers. This kicked off my project and the donations that were brought to the talent show stocked a cabinet at Alden Middle School. I received the proceeds from a Christmas performance at the Alden Presbyterian Church to help fund my project. I then also established a bank account for the counselors to purchase other needed items for kids. I met with Girl Scout leaders in my service unit and Girl Scout troops in Warsaw to promote Danny’s Helping Hands and encourage younger troops to carry on my project in their schools.”

Jegierski added, “Girl Scouts has given me many opportunities to discover that helping others makes me feel really good. I have become more confident and find it easier to talk to people and advocate for myself.”

Jegierski will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019.The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Elizabeth Fredette: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Elizabeth Fredette of Fairport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Fredette’s project was titled “Update of Potter Park.”

Fredette explained, “Potter Park is a relatively popular meeting place for many groups in our town of Fairport, but due to the building’s historical status we can’t hang anything on the walls. To fix this issue I made an easel which groups can write on as well as hang posters from. I also updated the first aid kit that was already at Potter, making sure to create a paper so that the Fairport Service Unit could keep the kit updated for the next 5 years. Finally I took this whole process and created a video which I posted on YouTube so that other girls could update their own community centers.”

Fredette added, “Girl Scouts has given me so many opportunities to give back to my community over the years. It has also helped me to meet many other girls and even given me the chance to see the impact of my influence on them. Girl Scouts has given me almost all of my strong female role models, including my troop leader who was also my mother, all of my fellow scouts’ mothers and all the women who helped run the Fairport Service Unit. I don’t think I would be as confident in myself as I am had I not been given the chance to be a Girl Scout. I’ve built a friendship with the scouts of my troop which I’m sure will extend well into our adult lives.”

Fredette will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Kennedy Craven: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Kennedy Craven of Cheektowaga, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Craven’s project was titled “Timmy’s Battle Blood Drive.”

Craven explained, “The idea for my Gold Award came to me when my friend, Timothy, was diagnosed in February 2018 with Leukemia. Holding a blood drive was a great way for my friend’s story to get out into the community and a way to save lives. Teaming with UNYTS, we also brought the United We Give Campaign on board. My troop had already been hosting blood drives for the past seven years for one of the girls in my Girl Scout troop. She had a heart transplant a few years ago. Knowing how important blood and tissue donations and transplants are, I felt this was a great way to educate my community on that matter. Timothy, who has aspirations to become a firefighter like his father, inspired me to reach out to my local fire station where his father is a member, to see if it was possible to hold the blood drive at their fire station. I received notice from their Board of Directors that they were willing to lend their space for the blood drive, which I named Timmy’s Battle Blood Drive. UNYTS set me up so I could schedule appointments and the community could schedule their own. They also gave me posters that I helped design to help spread the word. My high school principal granted me approval to hang posters around school to help gain support from our fellow classmates. The support from my family, friends, and community members was overwhelming. Not only did we double our goal of double red collections, we also received ten whole blood donations. Each time a person donates they save up to three lives.

Craven added, “Girl Scouts made me become friends with people that otherwise I would have not had the chance to be friends with. It taught me how to mentor young girls and the importance of community service.”

Craven will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Olivia Rosen: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Olivia Rosen of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Rosen’s project was titled “Don’t Forget the PICU.”

Rosen explained, “I collected school supplies and sewed pajamas for the Rochester Golisano Children’s Hospital, specifically the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, as most people like to donate to the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit), where the newborn babies are. However, the PICU (pediatric intensive care unit) houses kids anywhere from babies that are a few weeks old to 19-year-olds, giving them a wide range of needs, which is why I endeavored to help them with things for older kids like pajama pants, and things for younger kids like crayons and markers.”

Rosen added, “Girl Scouting has given me the opportunity to be a leader among my peers in my own interests, and the ability to follow others to learn more about other things and broaden my horizons.”

Rosen will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Elisabeth McAllister: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Elisabeth McAllister of Buffalo, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. McAllister’s project was titled “Fleece for Friends.”

McAllister explained, “I helped provide handmade warm gear to guests of the South Buffalo Community Table, a soup kitchen located in South Buffalo. Guests could choose from fleece hats, scarves, and ear warmers to help keep them warm throughout the winter. I informed family, friends, and other Girl Scouts about the issues people without adequate protection from the cold faced and taught them how to make the items. About 120 items were donated to 60-70 people. I chose this project because winters get extremely cold here in Buffalo. I had heard through the news how it was endangering the health of the homeless and underprivileged in my community and wanted to help combat this issue. By providing warm gear I hoped to protect people from the cold and its effects.

McAllister added, “Being a Girl Scout has helped me meet new friends and explore activities that interest me. It has allowed me to follow my curiosity and learn about nature, culture, and crafts. It has helped me develop my leadership, such as communication and organization, in order to help those in need in my community. It has pushed me to go out of my comfort zone and use my strengths to make the world a better place.”

McAllister will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Jacquelynn Smith: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Jacquelynn Smith of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Smith’s project was titled “School Supplies for Children in Need.”

Smith explained, “For my Gold Award Project I created a school supplies drive at my high school, Greece Arcadia. I collaborated with Goodwill, Mission Share, and Develop Africa. During school I went to all study halls and presented my project to spread awareness that we have sources readily available daily that we take for granted. Students and faculty contributed new and used supplies so I could donate them to organizations in the Rochester community, as well as overseas. I was able to donate about 8 boxes to charity in Rochester and 2 overseas through Develop Africa.”

Smith added, “Girl Scouts prepared me for college because it has provided me with necessary life skills: being prepared, determined, leadership, as well as trying new things, going outside of my comfort zone, working hard, managing my time well, and staying positive.”

Smith will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Eliza Klos: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Eliza Klos of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Klos’ project was titled “Chestnut Ridge Park: Lower Loop Trail and Bridge Restoration.”

Klos explained, “My project focused on building and installing two new footbridges to replace broken bridges on the Lower Loop Trail in Chestnut Ridge Park in Orchard Park. I also restored the trail area around the bridges. I collaborated with the Erie County Parks Department, the Park Rangers, the Chestnut Ridge Conservancy, and Niemiec Builders. I chose this project because I use the park often. I enjoy running and hiking these trails and noticed the disrepair of the bridges and the impact to the trails and the forest. I wanted to improve the trails for all the people that enjoy the park and help minimize the environmental impact from the people going off-trail because of the broken bridges. The project helped improve the safety of the bridges and trails for my community and stopped the damage to the surrounding forest from the prior misuse of the trails. This project required that I assess and plan for the building and implementation of the bridges, and removal of the old bridges, in ways that were environmentally friendly. I also had to design the bridges using the proper materials to ensure they were sustainable. The project required that I develop and organize a team for each step of the process: from the design, to the approvals, to the building, installation, and removal of the bridges.”

Klos added, “Girl Scouting helped teach me about the importance of community involvement. Through Girl Scouts, I have made many friends. It has also provided me with a wide array of life experiences.”

Klos will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.