Emily Tills: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Emily Tills of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Tills’ project was titled “Raising Awareness of Bluebirds.”

Tills explained, “I made it my mission to help increase the bluebird population in Orchard Park. I went around various parks and took note of what needed to be repaired and sent it to the town engineer so he could start making said repairs. I also educated younger Girl Scouts and let them know how they could help out too. Then I made a website to document my findings and to increase awareness of bluebirds. I chose my project because I noticed that the bluebird population was declining and I wanted to do something about it.”

Tills will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Erin Brege: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Erin Brege of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Brege’s project was titled “Orchard Park Music Library.”

Brege explained, “I filed all of the music at each school in the Orchard Park district. I spent hours putting the pieces in order and entering their titles, composers, and publishers into a spreadsheet. I also created a new website for the school that carries all of this data. Teachers and students from any school in the district can log in and view which pieces are kept in which schools. My project has already begun to benefit the people in my district because the music in each school is so much easier to manage now. I was first inspired to do this for my project because of the need that I saw for it. Ever since I was a freshman in high school, I have seen countless students working on the music library for senior hours, only for it to get messed up again the following year because there was no system in place to keep it organized. With the spreadsheet and website that I’ve put together, this system does exist now, and the library can finally remain organized. After working at the high school, I realized that this organization would be beneficial for all of the schools in the district, and I moved on to work at the five remaining schools.”

Brege added, “Girl Scouting has taught me so many valuable lessons about myself, others and the world. One of the most important things that being a Girl Scout has taught me is how important it is that every girl knows how much of a difference she can make in the world. Tackling projects for different awards and badges as a Girl Scout has taught me how to take the initiative to work toward something that I want to achieve, a lesson that I think every child deserves to learn. I have become a much more responsible, outgoing person as a Girl Scout and I know that I will use these lessons throughout the rest of my life to continue to create change wherever I see it necessary.”

Brege will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Eliza Klos: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Eliza Klos of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Klos’ project was titled “Chestnut Ridge Park: Lower Loop Trail and Bridge Restoration.”

Klos explained, “My project focused on building and installing two new footbridges to replace broken bridges on the Lower Loop Trail in Chestnut Ridge Park in Orchard Park. I also restored the trail area around the bridges. I collaborated with the Erie County Parks Department, the Park Rangers, the Chestnut Ridge Conservancy, and Niemiec Builders. I chose this project because I use the park often. I enjoy running and hiking these trails and noticed the disrepair of the bridges and the impact to the trails and the forest. I wanted to improve the trails for all the people that enjoy the park and help minimize the environmental impact from the people going off-trail because of the broken bridges. The project helped improve the safety of the bridges and trails for my community and stopped the damage to the surrounding forest from the prior misuse of the trails. This project required that I assess and plan for the building and implementation of the bridges, and removal of the old bridges, in ways that were environmentally friendly. I also had to design the bridges using the proper materials to ensure they were sustainable. The project required that I develop and organize a team for each step of the process: from the design, to the approvals, to the building, installation, and removal of the bridges.”

Klos added, “Girl Scouting helped teach me about the importance of community involvement. Through Girl Scouts, I have made many friends. It has also provided me with a wide array of life experiences.”

Klos will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Hannah Rauh: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Hannah Rauh of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Rauh’s project was titled “Zika Virus Prevention Project.”

Rauh explained, “I put together one big package full of supplies necessary to prevent Zika virus and sent it to the Milton Cato Memorial Hospital in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. These supplies were distributed to pregnant women who were visiting doctors at this specific hospital. It is important for a pregnant woman to be diligent about mosquito bites because if she catches Zika while pregnant, her baby could be born with microcephaly. Each woman received one bug bracelet, one bug net, a bug spray, one citronella candle, a mosquito coil, a package of repellent wipes, a package of “bug bombs,” and an informational brochure about Zika prevention. I chose this project because of my interest in sciences and global interactions. I visited Saint Vincent and the Grenadines a few years ago and saw the poverty and need firsthand. For the second half of my project, I built 4 bat houses which were put up at Camp 7 Hills! These were just as important as the care package because bats are an essential part of our ecosystem, and help to keep the mosquito population under control. Younger Girl Scouts can also learn about the role of bats by observing the bat houses! I was able to collaborate with my Church, Nativity of Our Lord in Orchard Park, to set up a bake sale fundraiser. I raised almost $500 towards my project! This project definitely impacted not only my community, but a community in Saint Vincent who needed help!”

Rauh added, “Scouting has helped me to become a more friendly and welcoming person towards others. Also, it has helped me to become more outspoken and taught me to work hard to make positive change towards things that are important to me.”

Rauh will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Isabelle Wittman: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Isabelle Wittmann of Orchard Park, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Wittmann’s project was titled “Save the Bats.”

Wittmann explained, “The purpose of my project was to help the decreasing population of bats in New York State. By building bat houses and hanging them around the town and village of Orchard Park, I’m hoping that not only will bats benefit, but also the community. If more people become inspired to build or buy their own bat house to hang, the increasing bug population will decrease, therefore balancing the ecosystem. I chose this project because the environment is very important to me. We cannot let another endangered species go extinct. I met with the mayor of Orchard Park, the town supervisor, and the highway superintendent. They gave me approval to begin my project and hang the bat houses. I painted them dark and hung them 15 feet above ground to ensure success. I also made flyers on why the houses are so important with instructions to build them. The flyer is on display at the village hardware store.”

Wittmann added, “Girl Scouting has taught me many things. I’ve learned how to be a leader, communicate with others, and how to manage my time.”

Wittmann will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.