Work at Camp Piperwood this summer!


Do you want to volunteer this summer?  Are you looking to do an internship for college credit or majoring in education or camping administration?  Do you love working with children in an outdoor setting?

You can be part of a fantastic summer experience and make a difference in a child’s life!  All you need to do is become a summer camp counselor. You will help girls ages 5-17 develop their full potential; learn to work with, relate to, and respect others; and make decisions while contributing to the camp community. 

In addition, girls and staff alike will make and rekindle friendships, laugh, smile, and experience many new and different things. Paid and volunteer positions available.

Positions available at Camp Piperwood (Day Camp):

  • Unit Counselors
  • Ropes Course Director (training provided)
  • Ropes Course Counselors (training provided)

Interested applicants please contact Janet DePetrillo, Director of Camp Administration at (716)935-6063 or janet.depetrillo@gswny.org To fill out an application click here.

Camp is a commitment of 6/7 weeks, 1 week of staff training and 5/6 weeks of camp.  Although we would like all staff to be able to commit to the entire summer, we realize that sometimes situations arise that prevent this.  If this is the case for you, please do not let this deter you from applying.  We will work with you on the number of weeks that you can commit to working at camp. 

  • Day Camp Dates: Staff week- Saturday, June 22 to June 27, and July 1 through August 10, 2019 summer camp sessions.

Olivia Rosen: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Olivia Rosen of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Rosen’s project was titled “Don’t Forget the PICU.”

Rosen explained, “I collected school supplies and sewed pajamas for the Rochester Golisano Children’s Hospital, specifically the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, as most people like to donate to the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit), where the newborn babies are. However, the PICU (pediatric intensive care unit) houses kids anywhere from babies that are a few weeks old to 19-year-olds, giving them a wide range of needs, which is why I endeavored to help them with things for older kids like pajama pants, and things for younger kids like crayons and markers.”

Rosen added, “Girl Scouting has given me the opportunity to be a leader among my peers in my own interests, and the ability to follow others to learn more about other things and broaden my horizons.”

Rosen will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Jacquelynn Smith: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Jacquelynn Smith of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Smith’s project was titled “School Supplies for Children in Need.”

Smith explained, “For my Gold Award Project I created a school supplies drive at my high school, Greece Arcadia. I collaborated with Goodwill, Mission Share, and Develop Africa. During school I went to all study halls and presented my project to spread awareness that we have sources readily available daily that we take for granted. Students and faculty contributed new and used supplies so I could donate them to organizations in the Rochester community, as well as overseas. I was able to donate about 8 boxes to charity in Rochester and 2 overseas through Develop Africa.”

Smith added, “Girl Scouts prepared me for college because it has provided me with necessary life skills: being prepared, determined, leadership, as well as trying new things, going outside of my comfort zone, working hard, managing my time well, and staying positive.”

Smith will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Megan Gearinger: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Megan Gearinger of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Gearinger’s project was titled “Build Friendship, Grow with Love.”

Gearinger explained, “My project was completed at the Gymnastics Training Center of Rochester (GTC) in Penfield. Sadly, teenage suicide has become a reality in several local schools in recent years, including an athlete at GTC. Teens who feel personally connected to others are less likely to commit suicide. The intention of my project was to build a sense of community on the Girls Gymnastics Team at GTC, so that all girls would feel accepted and cared for. This was accomplished through three aspects of my project. A Card Creation Center was started. This is a box filled with homemade stencils, cards, and markers. Teammates were paired into Big Buddies and Little Buddies. These Buddies send each other cards for birthdays, before/after meets, or for weekly encouragement. This system has been highly successful in building friendships and team support. A wooden bench was built for the gym, as a place for teammates and families to gather and socialize. Finally, a perennial memorial flower garden was planted near the parking lot entrance to help create a welcoming atmosphere and to honor those from the GTC family who have passed away. Through this project the GTC Girls Team has become much more connected and these friendships continue to blossom, even outside of the gym.”

Gearinger added, “Girl Scouts has provided educational and recreational experiences I would not have otherwise been exposed to and has offered leadership opportunities that I may not have taken advantage of. Sometimes I had to leave my comfort zone and that helped me learn and grow as an individual.”

Gearinger will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Megan Reilly: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Megan Reilly of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Reilly’s project was titled “Springdale Farm Scavenger Hunt.”

Reilly explained, “I installed a scavenger hunt at Springdale Farm in Spencerport. I incorporated sign language into each of my sustainable signs. This farm is run by Heritage Christian Services and is open to the public. I chose this project because my family used to visit the farm and picnic there when I was a little girl. I worked with many people from the farm including the director, farm manager, camp coordinator, and the IT director. I designed all of the signs and met with a printer. The signs were graciously donated by Phoenix Graphics. You can find my project listed on the Springdale Farm website under attractions. This project has impacted my community by including the deaf community and inspiring others to learn some sign language. My hope is to make people comfortable with another form of communication and help to break language barriers. During my time at Springdale Farm, I also volunteered at the petting zoo and at their summer camps where we were able to incorporate my scavenger hunt and teach the children sign language. It was a lot of fun to see my project in action!”

The sign language video is available at youtu.be/DGD_qP0JMjg for public viewing.

Reilly added, “[Through Girl Scouts] I had the opportunity to do so many different things since I was little. When I was younger I really enjoyed the arts and crafts and field trips. As I’ve gotten older I’ve enjoyed the service projects and our trip to Costa Rica! It was an amazing opportunity.”

Reilly will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Charlotte Spaulding: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Charlotte Spaulding of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Spaulding’s project was titled “Bluebird Houses.”

Spaulding explained, “I built bluebird houses for Odonata Sanctuary in Honeoye Falls. The purpose of my project was to help Odonata Sanctuary become one of the largest bluebird trails in New York. The project helped increase the bluebird population and bring awareness to the community on how important it is to help the bluebirds. I built the bluebird houses and went out every weekend to check and monitor them. After that, I put all of the information I collected into a spreadsheet to see how successful the project was.”

Spaulding added, “Girl Scouts has helped me with my confidence when being a leader in a group project and has taught me the different ways to reach out and help the community. I know how to work as a group and get through a problem.”

Spaulding will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Ann Susan Glenning: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Anne Susan Glenning of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Glenning’s project was titled “Protecting Our Future with Fire Safety.”

Glenning explained, “I did fire safety presentations to elementary students in my town (Pittsford). I made binders for the elementary schools in my town with fire safety activities and projects. I also shoveled and cleaned out the fire hydrants after wind and snow storms. I collaborated with the Pittsford Fire Department. I feel strongly about the agency because I am a Fire Department Explorer. I also worked on recruiting additional members.”

Glenning added, “I enjoy helping people and being a role model to younger Girl Scouts.”

Glenning will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.