Camp Piperwood inspires girls through powerful female role models

Similar to how girls at resident camp are with their units all week, those who attend Camp Piperwood are sorted into groups by age and every group is given a name that corresponds with the camp’s theme.

For 2019, Camp Piperwood has the theme of ‘Explore More’ and the camp staff wanted to choose powerful female role models that relate to exploration. Each Girl Scout level pulls from a different area, whether fiction or non-fiction.

The Daisy groups are named for TV and movie characters:

  • Dora the Explorer
  • Kim Possible
  • Velma and Daphne from Scooby Doo

The Brownies are literary themed:

  • Cam Jansen
  • Babysitters Club
  • Nancy Drew
  • Ramona Quimby
  • Trixie Belden
  • The Sisters 8

The Juniors are scientists:

  • Jane Goodall
  • Madame Curie
  • Rachel Carson
  • Sally Ride
  • Mae Jemison

And the Cadettes are named for historical leaders and explorers:

  • Harriet Tubman
  • Bessie Coleman
  • Nelly Bly
  • Sacagawea
  • Pocahontas

Those doing ropes are Amelia Earhart.

Each week, all the girls who come to Camp Piperwood sign a Kindness Contract with their group. These documents serve as an agreement between groups that they will treat each other, their counselors, and the other campers with respect.

Beyond others they interact with, these contracts are also about ways to be respectful to themselves and a reminder to always treat themselves well.

Check out some of the Kindness Contracts from this year!

Micaela Deutsch: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Micaela Deutsch of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Deutsch’s project was titled “H.O.P.E. Car Care Kits.”

Deutsch explained, “For my project, I collected hygiene products and assembled 500 hygiene bags for the homeless community in Rochester. The kits are intended for car owners to distribute if they come across a homeless person while driving. The kits are pre-made and ready to be handed out the car window. I decided to focus my project on homelessness because I did a research paper my freshman year of high school about chronic homelessness. I was intrigued by the relationship between poverty and homelessness. Another reason I focused on homelessness is because the city of Rochester is the poorest city of its size. I worked with Saint Pius X Church to hold my donation collection and bag assembly event. I also worked with the House of Mercy homeless shelter where I delivered the majority of the bags. My project impacted the community by bringing awareness to the issue of homelessness as well as providing an easy way for people to help. I participated in a run on Christmas day that ended at the House of Mercy. I delivered many of my bags to the people there and got to sing Christmas carols with the people as well. For the continuation of my project, I posted a YouTube video on how to make the hygiene bags. I also created flyers with information about the hygiene bags that I put in libraries, YMCA locations, and local cafes.”

Deutsch added, “Girl Scouting has taught me to be more confident in myself to take on challenges, such as the Gold Award. I have also improved my communication skills and networking skills by reaching out to businesses and organizations about projects my troop has completed.”

Deutsch will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Emily Glidden: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Emily Glidden of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Glidden’s project was titled “His Ministries Pancake Fundraiser.”

Glidden explained, “I did a pancake dinner fundraiser for a foster care ministry called HIS Ministries. We held the dinner at First Bible Baptist Church. I chose the project because I have a strong heart for kids, kids with disabilities, and foster kids. My project benefited and supported the foster families, and with these donations we are able to help, support, and show kindness to these families. I held the dinner and I served 251 people and used over $1,700 in profits to purchase baby items to donate, plus I received over $400 in donations to also purchase items with. I got to personally donate the items to families and see their faces and happiness and joy from that.”

Glidden added, “[Girl Scouts] has made me realize how important stepping up and being a leader really is and how much younger girls look up to us as older girls and how much of an impact on them we have.”

Glidden will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Hannah McGroarty: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Hannah McGroarty of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. McGroarty’s project was titled “Twice as Nice: Re-Loved Uniforms.”

McGroarty explained, “My project was to collect and organized school uniforms at Seton Catholic School to reduce waste and help families save money. By others donating uniforms that no longer fit, other children are able to enjoy them and the used uniforms are more affordable. There will be a clothes drive twice a year and students will continue giving their old uniforms. I made fact sheets and put them in teacher’s mailboxes for them to hand out to students. The most successful aspect was the cooperation from the school administrators allowing me to work with their school to establish this program.”

McGroarty added, “My favorite [memory] is that I sold the most Girl Scout cookies anyone sold ever: 3,211 boxes. It was so hard, but I did enjoy it. The lessons I learned throughout that month will be with me always. It started me on a path to marketing and advertising! I am so thankful for my Mom always supporting and encouraging Girl Scouting in my life! I have made so many friends and memories with my troop. We have accomplished many skills and enjoyed building ourselves and each other along the way.”

McGroarty will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Work at Camp Piperwood this summer!


Do you want to volunteer this summer?  Are you looking to do an internship for college credit or majoring in education or camping administration?  Do you love working with children in an outdoor setting?

You can be part of a fantastic summer experience and make a difference in a child’s life!  All you need to do is become a summer camp counselor. You will help girls ages 5-17 develop their full potential; learn to work with, relate to, and respect others; and make decisions while contributing to the camp community. 

In addition, girls and staff alike will make and rekindle friendships, laugh, smile, and experience many new and different things. Paid and volunteer positions available.

Positions available at Camp Piperwood (Day Camp):

  • Unit Counselors
  • Ropes Course Director (training provided)
  • Ropes Course Counselors (training provided)

Interested applicants please contact Janet DePetrillo, Director of Camp Administration at (716)935-6063 or janet.depetrillo@gswny.org To fill out an application click here.

Camp is a commitment of 6/7 weeks, 1 week of staff training and 5/6 weeks of camp.  Although we would like all staff to be able to commit to the entire summer, we realize that sometimes situations arise that prevent this.  If this is the case for you, please do not let this deter you from applying.  We will work with you on the number of weeks that you can commit to working at camp. 

  • Day Camp Dates: Staff week- Saturday, June 22 to June 27, and July 1 through August 10, 2019 summer camp sessions.

Olivia Rosen: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Olivia Rosen of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Rosen’s project was titled “Don’t Forget the PICU.”

Rosen explained, “I collected school supplies and sewed pajamas for the Rochester Golisano Children’s Hospital, specifically the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, as most people like to donate to the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit), where the newborn babies are. However, the PICU (pediatric intensive care unit) houses kids anywhere from babies that are a few weeks old to 19-year-olds, giving them a wide range of needs, which is why I endeavored to help them with things for older kids like pajama pants, and things for younger kids like crayons and markers.”

Rosen added, “Girl Scouting has given me the opportunity to be a leader among my peers in my own interests, and the ability to follow others to learn more about other things and broaden my horizons.”

Rosen will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Jacquelynn Smith: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Jacquelynn Smith of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Smith’s project was titled “School Supplies for Children in Need.”

Smith explained, “For my Gold Award Project I created a school supplies drive at my high school, Greece Arcadia. I collaborated with Goodwill, Mission Share, and Develop Africa. During school I went to all study halls and presented my project to spread awareness that we have sources readily available daily that we take for granted. Students and faculty contributed new and used supplies so I could donate them to organizations in the Rochester community, as well as overseas. I was able to donate about 8 boxes to charity in Rochester and 2 overseas through Develop Africa.”

Smith added, “Girl Scouts prepared me for college because it has provided me with necessary life skills: being prepared, determined, leadership, as well as trying new things, going outside of my comfort zone, working hard, managing my time well, and staying positive.”

Smith will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.