#GivingTuesday: Troop stories from around council

In our Facebook Lives today, we’re highlighting troop stories from around our nine counties. Here’s a closer look:

Genesee County

Troop 42115 participated in a Trick or Eat event in the East Pembroke neighborhood. Girls distributed flyers about their plan to support the local Corfu/Pembroke food pantry.

Just before Halloween, the girls in their costumes and their adult helpers collected the donations from the neighborhood. Check out all the food they collected!

Chautauqua County

Troop 20010 spent time learning about animals and went to the SPCA serving Erie County! The girls learned about animal habits, saw the wildlife hospital, and did presentations about endangered species and protecting animals. They also got to meet some furry new friends!

Niagara County

Troop 74148 completed their Community Badge by doing a scavenger hunt around their neighborhood finding symbols, monuments, and flags. They really liked the tribute to September 11.

They also had a special speaker: Megan Houseman. She spoke about being a woman in the military and showed them how to march and hold a flag.

Orleans County

Troop 82007 visited the Niagara Aquarium and Corning Museum of Glass in June.

This troop takes a ton of trips and have done things like camping on a beach in New Jersey! They also attend the vast majority of council programs offered for their age. They are almost always on an adventure!

Erie County

Troop 30677 took part in the Great Lakes Beach Sweep in September! A clean beach is an exciting thing and a great way to appreciate your neighborhood.

Cattaraugus County

Troop 10045 earned their Bronze Award building pollinator boxes for mason bees.

The bees nest in holes made by woodpeckers and beetles. The pollinator boxes include bundles of tubes where the bees can reproduce and lay eggs. The tubes are filled with eggs, nectar, and pollen, and sealed with mud plugs from which mature bees emerge in the spring.

Livingston County

Ashantee Troop 51063 and Rolling Hills Troop 51015 have been pen pals for the whole school year. They also co-hosted a party where they played games, tie-dyed t-shirts, and had ice cream sundaes.

Wyoming County

46 girls from Oatka Valley SU went Whitewater rafting in June with Adventure Calls Outfitters.

Monroe County

Pittsford Service Unit recently had a Pad Packing Party for their Period Insecurity Project. The Service Unit has worked with Scensibles the last 3 years. They provided the products and the Girl Scouts make the period packs for girls in the Rochester City School District.

Forty girls packed 2000 packs which contained: 2 pads, a liner, a hand sanitizer, and a Scensibles disposal bag. Additional menstrual care items were donated to the Pittsford food pantry. This project is great because it’s by girls for girls and it’s very empowering!

#GivingTuesday 2019 is tomorrow!

Hopefully, your return to work today isn’t too hard after a Thanksgiving holiday spent with friends and family. The big shopping days of Black Friday and Cyber Monday are behind us, but you can still make a difference this holiday season by supporting Girl Scouts on #GivingTuesday.

2018-Giving Tuesday Email Header

#GivingTuesday is the social revolution of generosity and it’s happening tomorrow! Your support helps us continue to make a difference in the lives of our girls. Consider giving today and join the global movement to celebrate giving back.

We’re so thankful for our supporters, volunteers, advocates, and donors who embrace our mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. Without you, we couldn’t reach the thousands of girls across Western New York and deliver programming designed to set them up for success.

This year, we rolled out more than 200 programs focusing on our pillars of outdoors, STEM, life skills, and entrepreneurship, and everything in between. We want every girl to have the chance to pursue her dreams – whatever it looks for her.

Some of the programs we’ve held so far include a Pathways to Health Professional workshop where girls explored science and more; a Trailblazers program for our youngest Girl Scouts where they learned about fire building, tent pitching, leave no trace, and orienteering; a Maker Mania event at JCC that had the girls designing 3D patches, seeing a 3D printer in action, exploring the art of fingerprinting, and becoming beginner welders; a Glass Fusing class at Rochester Arc + Flame; and our 50th Anniversary Skills and Chills where girls competed in skills like canoeing, kayaking, fire building, tent pitching, log sawing, first aid, orienteering, archery, and more!

Plus, for the first time ever, our Girl Advisory Board held a conference for our Girl Scouts around council. The 2019 GIRL Experience Convention welcomed more than 300 attendees at Daemen College last month. The morning featured empowering keynote speakers and a Q&A. Following lunch, all levels were invited to an expo featuring many of our amazing program partners. From aerial arts to martial arts, face painting to robotics, and everything in between, this girl-led and girl-driven event represented what it means to be a Girl Scout.

All of this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to what our Girl Scouts are doing and how donations support their growth. Join us on Facebook tomorrow to hear stories from counties around our council of what Girl Scouts are doing to make a difference, just like you.

Thank you for all that you do.

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Why Girl Scouts?

For more than 100 years, we’ve been the preeminent leadership organization for girls, developing businesswomen, astronauts, governors, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and even secretaries of state. The benefit of our program speaks for itself, yet it’s easy to miss why our program is so important.

The Girl Scout difference is real and powerful, and we want your girl to be a part of it, too.

It’s more than just a century of experience that helps us build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’ve done the research to make sure we’re reaching girls where it matters and delivering what they need.

From this we know your girl will learn best in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment, which is exactly what we provide. What this doesn’t mean is a stereotypical ‘girl’ experience with where we do crafts and play with dolls. In fact, we usually prefer robots.

We’re redefining what it means to do something like a girl and showing girls how smart and valuable they are. We’re also girl-led, which means in Girl Scouts, your girl takes the lead. We provide programming for many areas, but the rest of it is in your daughter’s hands.

Instead of telling a girl what she should like or do, we let her choose. We give her opportunities to get outdoors, to learn about coding and cybersecurity, to learn how to run and a business, and so much more.

Oh yeah, and we also sell Girl Scout cookies.

As the largest girl-run entrepreneurial program in the world, our Girl Scout cookie sales are about more than fundraising and providing the USA with our delicious cookies. When you sell, you learn about business planning and financial literacy. Each level teaches you something different about these areas so every year, your girl is expanding her knowledge and building on her skills.

All our programming stands on our four pillars: STEM, Outdoors, Entrepreneurship, and Life Skills. The last encompasses several areas, including our commitment to improving our world.

Service is built into so much of what Girl Scouts do. Whether it’s making centerpieces for holiday dinners at homeless shelters or collecting blankets or educating their peers and advocating for more resources, our girls do some incredible work to help those around them.

Girl and troops do projects throughout the year, but we also have three levels of higher awards to promote this culture of giving back. Girl Scout Juniors (4th and 5th graders) can work in their troop for a minimum of 20 hours on a project to earn their Bronze Award.

Next, our Cadettes (6th, 7th, and 8th graders) can earn their Silver Award. Here they’ll work by themselves or in a small group of Girl Scouts for a minimum of 50 hours on a service project.

Finally, our Seniors (9th and 10th) and Ambassadors (11th and 12th) can earn the Girl Scout Gold Award, our highest honor. This is a completely individual process and each girl must spend a minimum of 80 hours dedicated to their project. Beyond a one-time service initiative, they have to focus on something that is sustainable and will continue to make an impact after they’re done.

Sound difficult? That’s because it is. Since the beginning of our higher awards, one million girls have earned their Gold Award. That means fewer than 6% of all our Girl Scouts earn it annually.

For those who’ve ‘gone gold,’ it’s worth it. Not only can you enter the military a whole rank higher just for earning it, it’s a critical element in the college admissions decision process.

At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter what kind of girl yours is because here, we’re all Girl Scout. We have something for her to and can help prepare her for a lifetime of leadership.