#GivingTuesday: Troop stories from around council

In our Facebook Lives today, we’re highlighting troop stories from around our nine counties. Here’s a closer look:

Genesee County

Troop 42115 participated in a Trick or Eat event in the East Pembroke neighborhood. Girls distributed flyers about their plan to support the local Corfu/Pembroke food pantry.

Just before Halloween, the girls in their costumes and their adult helpers collected the donations from the neighborhood. Check out all the food they collected!

Chautauqua County

Troop 20010 spent time learning about animals and went to the SPCA serving Erie County! The girls learned about animal habits, saw the wildlife hospital, and did presentations about endangered species and protecting animals. They also got to meet some furry new friends!

Niagara County

Troop 74148 completed their Community Badge by doing a scavenger hunt around their neighborhood finding symbols, monuments, and flags. They really liked the tribute to September 11.

They also had a special speaker: Megan Houseman. She spoke about being a woman in the military and showed them how to march and hold a flag.

Orleans County

Troop 82007 visited the Niagara Aquarium and Corning Museum of Glass in June.

This troop takes a ton of trips and have done things like camping on a beach in New Jersey! They also attend the vast majority of council programs offered for their age. They are almost always on an adventure!

Erie County

Troop 30677 took part in the Great Lakes Beach Sweep in September! A clean beach is an exciting thing and a great way to appreciate your neighborhood.

Cattaraugus County

Troop 10045 earned their Bronze Award building pollinator boxes for mason bees.

The bees nest in holes made by woodpeckers and beetles. The pollinator boxes include bundles of tubes where the bees can reproduce and lay eggs. The tubes are filled with eggs, nectar, and pollen, and sealed with mud plugs from which mature bees emerge in the spring.

Livingston County

Ashantee Troop 51063 and Rolling Hills Troop 51015 have been pen pals for the whole school year. They also co-hosted a party where they played games, tie-dyed t-shirts, and had ice cream sundaes.

Wyoming County

46 girls from Oatka Valley SU went Whitewater rafting in June with Adventure Calls Outfitters.

Monroe County

Pittsford Service Unit recently had a Pad Packing Party for their Period Insecurity Project. The Service Unit has worked with Scensibles the last 3 years. They provided the products and the Girl Scouts make the period packs for girls in the Rochester City School District.

Forty girls packed 2000 packs which contained: 2 pads, a liner, a hand sanitizer, and a Scensibles disposal bag. Additional menstrual care items were donated to the Pittsford food pantry. This project is great because it’s by girls for girls and it’s very empowering!

Have you visited the Volunteer Marketing Asset Portal?

Next time you need images or flyers for an event, check out the GSWNY Volunteer Marketing Asset Portal, password GSWNY1! We have editable flyers available for you to download highlighting our Four Pillars as well general event and join flyers in both full and half page styles. Also included is a  GSWNY Brand Guide to ensure everything you create falls in line with the Girl Scout brand and doesn’t infringe on anything under trademark or copyright. 

There are five types of flyer templates available, including designs for general upcoming events and styles focusing on our Four Pillars. STEM, Outdoors, Entrepreneurship, and Life Skills. All templates come in both full- and half-page to suit your specific needs.

In addition to flyers, we have images promoting our program available as well, ranging from camp to the DNA of a G.I.R.L.

All of this and more can be found on the GSWNY Volunteer Marketing Portal, password GSWNY1. Make sure you check out the Brand Guide as well to make sure your events and flyers go in-line with Girl Scouts branding without infringing on any copyrights.

If you have any questions about branding, flyer templates, or anything related to promoting your Girl Scouts, please email communications@gswny.org. A member of our marketing team will be more than happy to assist with your inquiries!

Ellen Chapman: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Ellen Chapman of Buffalo, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Chapman’s project was titled “New Home For Stitch Buffalo.”

Chapman explained, “My Gold Award Project took place in Buffalo working with an organization called Stitch Buffalo. Stitch Buffalo works with refugee women in Buffalo to help them create items to sell to generate income for their families. I felt that working with them could be the most meaningful project I could do. I also appreciate the work that Stitch Buffalo creates for the women in my community. The purpose of my project was provide a suitable space for the women of Stitch Buffalo to work outside. The organization had recently moved to their own location, and I wanted to make sure they could maximize their space. To finish this project I first had to fundraise. I held a bake sale at one of Stitch Buffalo’s annual sales. I sold coffee, tea and other baked goods. I received a gift card from the Lexington Co-op to help with the bake sale. I then weeded out the backyard of their location, and purchased a table to give them. I also volunteered to help them sort their donations as they moved locations.”

Chapman added, “Being in Girl Scouts has allowed me to experience so many new things. We’ve gone white water rafting, learned how to fence, made pasta from scratch, gone horseback riding, visited colleges, and gone to New York City. I’ve learned so much from my troop leader; she’s so organized and inspiring. Honestly, she’s the reason I still do Girl Scouts. She and many other women have been a part of my Girl Scout journey, and I’m extremely thankful.”

Chapman will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Micaela Deutsch: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Micaela Deutsch of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Deutsch’s project was titled “H.O.P.E. Car Care Kits.”

Deutsch explained, “For my project, I collected hygiene products and assembled 500 hygiene bags for the homeless community in Rochester. The kits are intended for car owners to distribute if they come across a homeless person while driving. The kits are pre-made and ready to be handed out the car window. I decided to focus my project on homelessness because I did a research paper my freshman year of high school about chronic homelessness. I was intrigued by the relationship between poverty and homelessness. Another reason I focused on homelessness is because the city of Rochester is the poorest city of its size. I worked with Saint Pius X Church to hold my donation collection and bag assembly event. I also worked with the House of Mercy homeless shelter where I delivered the majority of the bags. My project impacted the community by bringing awareness to the issue of homelessness as well as providing an easy way for people to help. I participated in a run on Christmas day that ended at the House of Mercy. I delivered many of my bags to the people there and got to sing Christmas carols with the people as well. For the continuation of my project, I posted a YouTube video on how to make the hygiene bags. I also created flyers with information about the hygiene bags that I put in libraries, YMCA locations, and local cafes.”

Deutsch added, “Girl Scouting has taught me to be more confident in myself to take on challenges, such as the Gold Award. I have also improved my communication skills and networking skills by reaching out to businesses and organizations about projects my troop has completed.”

Deutsch will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Krystina Gierlach: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Krystina Gierlach of Fairport, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Gierlach’s project was titled “Mythbusters Campaign.”

Gierlach explained, “For my Gold Award project, I created a prize wheel displaying common misconceptions about organ donation. This wheel will be given to the Finger Lakes Donor Recovery Network so they can take it to many events in order to spread the truth about organ donation. I chose this project because I think everyone should know the facts behind donation so they can make an informed decision about whether or not to become an organ donor. Too often, people only know what they’ve been told, which is usually something that’s not completely true. I’ve grown up around organ donation and I think everyone should have access to the truth behind donation, instead of only hearing the scary parts. My hope with this project is that young kids will want to spin the wheel and in the process learn about donation at a young age so they will grow up with that information, not any misconceptions.”

Gierlach added, “Girl Scouts has given me a set of values and tons of community service experience. It has also given me friends that I will have for the rest of my life.”

Gierlach will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Emily Glidden: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Emily Glidden of Rochester, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Glidden’s project was titled “His Ministries Pancake Fundraiser.”

Glidden explained, “I did a pancake dinner fundraiser for a foster care ministry called HIS Ministries. We held the dinner at First Bible Baptist Church. I chose the project because I have a strong heart for kids, kids with disabilities, and foster kids. My project benefited and supported the foster families, and with these donations we are able to help, support, and show kindness to these families. I held the dinner and I served 251 people and used over $1,700 in profits to purchase baby items to donate, plus I received over $400 in donations to also purchase items with. I got to personally donate the items to families and see their faces and happiness and joy from that.”

Glidden added, “[Girl Scouts] has made me realize how important stepping up and being a leader really is and how much younger girls look up to us as older girls and how much of an impact on them we have.”

Glidden will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.

Sydney Grossman: 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Western New York is proud to announce Sydney Grossman of Hamburg, NY, as a 2019 Gold Award Girl Scout. Grossman’s project was titled “Beautifying Bemus Library.”

Grossman explained, “I repainted the Bemus Library conference room and decorated it with photographs taken at a handful of events that took place at the library. In doing this I hoped it would encourage people to spend more time there and enjoy the library more. The second part of my project was building a book share box; which is where you can take a book and replace it with one of your own some where in the community other than the library. I hope the book box will remind the community about the library and what it is worth to the community.”

Grossman will receive her Gold Award at the Gold Award Ceremony on June 1, 2019. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls.

The Gold Award project is the culmination of all the work a girl puts into “going for the Gold.” A Girl Scout’s project should be something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action that encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills. The project should also fulfill a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global) and create change that has the potential to be on-going or sustainable. Approximately 80 hours of community service are involved in the project. Completion of the Gold Award also qualifies the Girl Scout for special scholarship opportunities and to enter the military a full rank higher than her peers.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the most prestigious award in the world for girls, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers.

The Gold Award requires a Girl Scout to identify an issue and investigate it to understand what can be done to address the problem. The girl then forms a team to act as a support system, including a project advisor close to the issue who is not a troop leader or family member, while she leads the project. The Girl Scout creates a plan to ensure they know what steps they must tackle while working on the project. The Girl Scout submits a proposal for her project to her local Girl Scout council. After acceptance, the girl begins to work through the steps of their plan utilizing the assistance of her support team where necessary. Lastly, the project is used to educate and inspire others about the cause they are addressing.

To learn more, visit gswny.org.